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  1. Enjoy Herbal Tea From Your Own Garden

    Enjoy Herbal Tea From Your Own Garden

    We all love growing herbs in our gardens. It's wonderful to have them at hand when cooking, and it's so nice to enjoy their good looks, scents and flavors while wandering the garden, too. But there are really only so much herbs you can use while cooking on a day to day basis. Why not use up your herbal surplus by making herbal teas? Most herbs that are commonly grown for tea, like Rosemary, Lemongrass, Lemon Balm and Spearmint, can be steeped both fresh and dried, so be sure to plant enough to store for the colder months, when a hot cup of tea will warm you up and remind you of your garden while it's covered in snow.
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  2. The 10 Easiest Flowers to Grow from Seeds

    The 10 Easiest Flowers to Grow from Seeds

    There's a certain level of pride and satisfaction that comes from starting seeds indoors, under grow lights. Setting up the lights, choosing just the right seed starting mix, sowing the seeds carefully, and watching over the soil for little sprouts to emerge. But darn it all, don't you sometimes want to just shove a seed into the ground, splash it with a hose and come back in a few days to see it growing all on its own? That can happen... Some annual flowering varieties actually prefer being sown where they're meant to grow. Here are our top ten picks for the absolute easiest flowering annuals to grow from seeds!
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  3. Space-Saving Veggies for Small Gardens

    Space-Saving Veggies for Small Gardens

    If you have a veggie garden on the small side, or if you're just starting out in the world of veggie gardening, there are certain crops you might hesitate to grow because they take up too much real estate. If you're feeling hemmed in by the constraints of your garden, try these smaller versions of normally-space-hogging veggies. They'll help you make the most of your garden's square footage, and make summertime dinners so much more interesting and delicious.
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  4. Winter Gardening Fun

    Winter Gardening Fun

    It's the depths of winter, and our gardens are peacefully slumbering. We've retreated indoors to cozy up to the fire and catch up on our favorite TV shows. But really, as much as we might enjoy the reprieve that winter brings, does your desire to garden ever sleep? Ours doesn't! Luckily, there is seed starting to plan for, and our seed catalog, but there are so many more ways to keep our gardening minds and hands active in the coldest months, both indoors and out.
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  5. When Should You Start Your Seeds?

    When Should You Start Your Seeds?

    One of the most-asked questions we get here at Kitchen Garden Seeds is, "When should I start my seeds?" It's a good question, and the short answer is, "It depends." It depends on your climate, the type of seeds you're sowing, and more. We thought we'd lay it all out for you in this post, which will help when you're planning your seed order.
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  6. Our Essential Seed-Starting Guide

    Our Essential Seed-Starting Guide

    Starting seeds indoors is fun and satisfying. It saves you money on plants and allows you to grow varieties that you just can't find locally. After months of wintry weather, starting seeds gets your hands back into the soil at long last. Just imagine Eggplants, Tomatoes and Zinnias, all started from tiny seeds. But how does one get started? Here's all the information you need.
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  7. Kalettes

    Kalettes

    Kalettes Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/4” -1/2”
    Row Spacing2’- 2 ½’
    Plant Spacing:18”
    Days to Germination:9-15 days
    Germination Temperature:70°-75°F

    Kalettes are a cross between Kale and Brussels Sprouts. Picture a Brussels Sprouts plant, but instead of what looks like little mini Cabbages growing along the tall stalk, imagine little heads of ruffled Kale. These “florets” are tender, sweet and milder-tasting than both Kale and Brussels Sprouts. Kalettes require a bit of patience to grow. Sow seeds indoors 4 to 6 weeks before transplanting out, 14 weeks before the first fall frost date. Plant 2 to 3 seeds per 3” pot. Thin to the strongest seedling in each pot. Plant out 18” apart into well-draining, moderately fertile soil in full sun. Water regularly, especially in dry weather, and fertilize lightly but often. Harvest when the florets are open and about 2” wide, well into fall. Kalettes get even bett
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  8. Purslane

    Purslane

    Purslane Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/4”
    Seed Spacing:3”
    Plant Spacing:6”-8”
    Days to Germination:7-10 days
    Germination Temperature:70°-90°F

    Portulaca oleracea. You may have heard that you can eat the weedy Purslane in your garden. You can! It's incredibly nutritious (high in vitamin A, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids and more), and can be used as a substitute for Spinach in so many ways, both raw and lightly cooked. It's wonderful in tossed salads. Not lucky enough to have this tasty weed in your garden? Grow it from seed! Purslane loves baking sun and lean soil. Direct-sow seeds ¼” deep and 3” apart well after the last frost date when the soil is reliably warm. Thin seedlings to 6 to 8 inches apart. Water regularly until established, after which Purslane is quite drought-tolerant. Harvest sprigs throughout the season when young and tender and cool them quickly. Purslane will store well in the fridge for
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  9. Candytuft

    Candytuft

    Candytuft Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/16”
    Seed Spacing:2”-3”
    Plant Spacing:12”
    Days to Germination:7-20 days
    Germination Temperature:70°-75°F

    Iberis umbellata. Candytuft is a beloved old-fashioned, fragrant, drought-tolerant annual. From late spring through fall, our Fairy Mixture flaunts flat-topped clusters of blooms in purple, lilac, rose and white on dwarf, dense, mounding plants. Bees and butterflies love it, but deer do not. Seeds are best direct-sown after the last spring frost date, but to get a head start on flowers, they may be started indoors 6 to 8 weeks earlier. The seeds require light to germinate, so scatter them on top of the soil, press them in firmly, and cover them with no more than a sixteenth-inch dusting of soil. When seedlings emerge, thin to 12” apart. Indoors, sow seeds in individual peat pots, as the plants form small tap roots that are sensitive to transplanting. Trimming ba
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  10. Dill

    Dill

    Dill Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/4”
    Row Spacing:12”
    Plant Spacing:4”-6”
    Days to Germination:21-25 days
    Germination Temperature:60°-70°F

    A delicious seasoning for fish and vegetables, Dill is a member of the Umbelliferae family and is known to attract beneficial insects to pollinate other vegetables and fruits in your kitchen gar- den. Sow anytime after the soil can be worked in the spring. Direct seed Dill in moderately fertile, well-draining soil in full direct sunlight. Sow small pinches of seed every 3" to 4". Then, carefully thin the seedlings to about 6" apart. Dill dislikes transplanting, so leave it alone except for regular watering and weeding. A wonderful leafy variety, direct sow Dill every 2 to 3 weeks for continual harvest through the
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