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Marjoram

A member of the Mint family, Marjoram was scattered throughout medieval households as an air freshener when bathing was but an annual event. A Greek symbol of wedded bliss, Marjoram was also grown on graves in the belief that it would imbue the deceased spirits with eternal peace and happiness. Today, it is a revered spice in prepared blends such as bouquet garni and fines herbes, and is said to be high in antioxidants when consumed fresh. It is prominently used in North African, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisines. Its oil is used for soothing bath tinctures and massage. Sun- and warmth-loving Marjoram is best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to setting out after the last spring frost date. When the spindly seedlings grow 2" tall, transplant them outdoors, planting three or four together in clumps at 6" intervals. Later, thin down to the strongest plant in each clump. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 1 year.

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Gardening Tips

Marjoram Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1/4”-1/2”
Row Spacing:12”-18”
Seed Spacing:3”-6”
Plant Spacing: 12”

Herbs may be either direct-sown outdoors after the threat of frost has passed, or started indoors for transplanting or container gardening. Herbs require moderately rich, well-draining soil with at least 5 hours of bright sunlight. To start indoors: sow lightly in sterilized seed mix, lightly moisten and cover with plastic wrap until germination takes place. Do not water again until sprouts emerge. Remove plastic wrap once sprouted. Transplant outdoors when the threat of frost has passed. Some perennials like Lavender, Catnip or Savory prefer to be started indoors. Others such as Chives, Sage or Fennel prefer to be direct-sown outside once the soil has warmed. Most herbs dislike chemicals or over-fertilization. Feed lightly with kelp or fish emulsion once seedlings are well established. Keep lightly moist: never wet. Pinch back the plants to avoid flowering and to encourage leaf production.