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Sweet Peas

Lathyrus odoratus. Sicilian natives, these nostalgic heirlooms have the pleasant, sweet fragrance of honey and oranges. Sweet Peas are hardy annuals that prefer cool, moist growing conditions. Large clusters of dainty flowers are borne on graceful vines that crave the support of a trellis, fence or secure netting. Soak the seeds for 24 to 48 hours prior to direct sowing outdoors in rich soil as soon as the ground can be worked in the spring. Or start as transplants 4 to 6 weeks prior to moving outside. In areas with milder winters, Sweet Peas may also be started in the late fall for early spring blossoms. A prized cut-flower, Sweet Peas love to be cut and groomed for increased flower production. Hardy annual. Spring flowering. Height: 6' to 8' .

Average seed life: 2 years.

**There is evidence that Sweet Pea flowers, if ingested in large quantities, can be toxic. Edible Pea flowers, on the other hand, are entirely edible. Find a full selection of Edible Pea varieties HERE.**

9 Item(s)

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Set Descending Direction

9 Item(s)

per page

Set Descending Direction

Gardening Tips

Sweet Peas Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1”
Seed Spacing:2”-3”
Plant Spacing:6”-8”
Days to Germination:10-21 days
Germination Temperature:55°-65°F

Lathyrus odoratus. Wonderfully scented, Sweet Peas prefer cool, moist growing conditions. Soak the seeds for 24 to 48 hours before planting. Sow in well-draining soil that is fertile and rich in organic matter as soon as the ground can be worked in the spring. Work in compost and/or well-rotted manure as needed. They can also be started indoors 4 to 6 weeks before transplanting outside. In areas with milder winters, Sweet Peas may also be started in the late fall for early spring blossoms. Once the seedlings reach 2" tall, thin to a spacing of 6" to 8" apart. Water well and mulch to keep roots cool and moist. Sweet Peas will need a solid support from a trellis, fence or netting to support their vines and profuse flowers. Cut the flowers often for sweet bouquets and keep up with dead-heading to increase flower production.

Days of Vines and Roses
If you’re looking for a great trellis on which to grow an annual vine, consider a sturdy, well-established climbing rose. The thorny canes provide excellent support, and won’t mind a little competition. Since the vines will come into their glory later in the season, they’ll add color to a rose that has finished its main flush of bloom. But any overlap will produce handsome combinations as well: Hyacinth Bean or Sweet Peas with a pale pink New Dawn rose, or blue Morning Glories with your favorite yellow-flowered climber.

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