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Spinach

Spinach prefers the cool, sunny weather of late spring and early fall. Direct-sow Spinach in the spring once the threat of frost has passed, and in late summer for fall harvest. Spinach adores rich soil: amend the Spinach bed well with compost and/or manure, dolomite lime and complete organic fertilizer. Keep the bed evenly moist and weeded. Early thinnings are wonderful for spring salads. For the kitchen gardener, it is practical to harvest by using the outer leaves from each plant or by cutting the whole plant, leaving 1" for possible regrowth. Or, broadcast seed and grow as a cut-and-come-again crop of tender leaves. If you simply must have Spinach during summer's dog days, plant the seed deeper, provide partial shade and water copiously. Convert everyone you know into Spinach-lovers with Carole Peck's Baked Penne Pasta with Lobster and Spinach and The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone's Spinach and Caramelized Onion Soufflé.

Average seed life: 2 years.

Regiment Spinach

Regiment Spinach Regiment Spinach Regiment Spinach Regiment Spinach Regiment Spinach
37 days. Dutch-bred Regiment is fast-growing, long-lasting, vigorous, bolt-resistant and resistant to downy mildew (races 1 through 7). In other words, it is perfect in the garden from early spring through the fall. It is also beautiful, with thick, semi-savoyed, slightly triangular, glistening dark green leaves that grow upright and uniformly (needs less washing than more floppy-leafed varieties). Now to the taste, the final measure of Spinach greatness. It is simply delicious prepared in every possible way. It has a crisp texture and a delicate flavor served fresh and raw in salads. And its substantive leaf holds up well when sautéed or braised for succulent creamed sauces, soups, pastas, savory pies or in a classic creamed Spinach alongside your grandmother's best meat loaf or your favorite grilled steak sprinkled with lightly fried crispy Shallot rings. (F1.)

One packet of about 300 seeds
Catalog #3915
$3.55
  • Buy 10 for $3.20 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $2.65 each and save 26%

Availability: In stock

$3.55

Gardening Tips

Spinach Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1/2”
Row Spacing:12”-18”
Seed Spacing:1/2”
Days to Germination:10-14 days
Germination Temperature:45°-85°F

Vitamin-rich Spinach likes it cool, so you may direct-sow in the spring as soon as you can work the soil. You may also sow in the late summer or early fall for fall and early winter harvest. Spinach thrives in rich soil, so amend beds with organic fertilizer, compost and/or well-rotted manure as needed. Keep soil evenly moist. When seedlings are 2" tall, thin to 4" to 5" apart. (Thinnings are great tossed into salads.) If you plant Spinach in warm weather, sow seeds deeper and in partial shade with frequent watering to help it avoid bolting. In cool climates, direct-sow Spinach seed every 2 to 3 weeks for constant harvest. To harvest, either use a few outer leaves from each plant or cut the plant off at the base, after which the plants will likely regrow a second crop of leaves. Make sure to wash thoroughly in cool water before use. Pat dry.

Cool Weather Spinach
Summer gardeners miss out on the three seasons in which this tasty, nutritious green truly thrives. For fall Spinach, wait until cool weather is just starting to settle in, but there are still enough frost-free days to bring the crop to maturity. For winter Spinach, just protect it with a cold frame or--if your climate is mild--a layer of straw. The outer leaves may look beat-up in the dead of winter, but fresh new growth will continually appear at the center. For spring Spinach, you can keep on harvesting these wintered-over plants, or start new ones from seed as soon as the soil can be worked. Another trick is to sow a late fall crop that will germinate just before the ground freezes up, then overwinter the young seedlings. (In cold climates, protect them with a cold frame.) They’ll start to grow as soon as spring arrives!

Hail to the Hardy Greens
Most garden greens can hardly wait for cool weather to come. They perk up and sweeten up as the mugginess of August fades away. Crops such as Spinach, Arugula, Claytonia and Mâche, if protected by a cold frame or simple unheated greenhouse, survive the winter in cold climates, to be cut and re-cut for a continuous harvest. Sow them in September in the north, October in warmer parts of the country. They do best hunkering down, close to the earth. Lettuce and Endive over-winter best when cut at baby leaf size rather than full-sized heads.

Kale, Collards and Brussels Sprouts fare better if grown to full size and left outdoors to soldier on as long as they can, since they do not re-grow if cut back in winter. We can often harvest them for our Christmas table, even in snowy Maine.

Shade Tolerance