Tabasco Hot Chile Pepper

85-90 days. Cultivated in Mexico since the early 1800's, this Chile Pepper was made famous in the US with the 1868 introduction of the McIlhenny Company's hot pepper sauce, Tabasco. Producing a compact plant from 2' to 4' high, Tabasco is well-suited for container gardening: its pods are just 3/8" wide by 1" long. Tabasco's fruits start yellow or green and ripen to bright red, which visually cues one in to its Scoville rating: a blistering hot 30,000 to 50,000! Tabasco's distinctive, hot-smoky flavor and its fiery heat make it one of the most recognized and famous of all Peppers! Undoubtedly, Tabasco is the heat in hot sauce. (OP.)

One packet of about 30 seeds
In stock
Item
#3690
$3.95
  • Buy 10 for $3.55 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $2.95 each and save 25%
  • Information

  • Best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to setting out after the last spring frost date, Hot Peppers love heat: afficionados theorize that the hotter the growing conditions, the hotter the Pepper. The heat in Peppers is related to the amount of capsaicin within the tissues and seeds. We include heat unit measurements (known as Scoville units) and arrange the Peppers in ascending incendiary order! At the height of harvest, hold a roast. Place picked Peppers on a hot grill, turning them until all sides are charred and blistered black. Pile them all in a paper bag so that they steam each other's skins off. Once they are cool enough to handle, peel off the skins, remove the stems and slice into long pieces, scraping away the seeds. Freeze in airtight plastic bags for use on sandwiches and in sauces, stews and casseroles through the winter. Deer resistant.

    Average seed life: 2 years.

  • Gardening Tips
  • Featured Recipes

Best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to setting out after the last spring frost date, Hot Peppers love heat: afficionados theorize that the hotter the growing conditions, the hotter the Pepper. The heat in Peppers is related to the amount of capsaicin within the tissues and seeds. We include heat unit measurements (known as Scoville units) and arrange the Peppers in ascending incendiary order! At the height of harvest, hold a roast. Place picked Peppers on a hot grill, turning them until all sides are charred and blistered black. Pile them all in a paper bag so that they steam each other's skins off. Once they are cool enough to handle, peel off the skins, remove the stems and slice into long pieces, scraping away the seeds. Freeze in airtight plastic bags for use on sandwiches and in sauces, stews and casseroles through the winter. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 2 years.

Back to Top