De Padron Hot Chile Pepper

55-65 days. This prized Spanish heirloom is setting the culinary world of tapas on fire. Often referred to as Spanish Roulette, one out of five Peppers may be extremely hot. De Padron yields thin-walled, conical 1" by 3" fruits with a normal Scoville heat index of 500, although the odd one will stun you with up to 25,000 heat units! The plants grow from 18" to 24" tall, yielding an abundant profusion of green hot Chile Peppers that mature to red. Normally picked when green, De Padron is so popular that there is a whole festival held in its honor each year in Padron, Spain. For your own tapas party, fry whole green De Padron in olive oil until white blisters appear. Drain on paper towels and season with coarse sea salt and cracked black pepper. Holding the stem, eat whole with a cool beer! (OP.)

One packet of about 20 seeds
In stock
Item
#3665
$4.15
  • Buy 10 for $3.75 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $3.10 each and save 25%
  • Information

  • Best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to setting out after the last spring frost date, Hot Peppers love heat: afficionados theorize that the hotter the growing conditions, the hotter the Pepper. The heat in Peppers is related to the amount of capsaicin within the tissues and seeds. We include heat unit measurements (known as Scoville units) and arrange the Peppers in ascending incendiary order! At the height of harvest, hold a roast. Place picked Peppers on a hot grill, turning them until all sides are charred and blistered black. Pile them all in a paper bag so that they steam each other's skins off. Once they are cool enough to handle, peel off the skins, remove the stems and slice into long pieces, scraping away the seeds. Freeze in airtight plastic bags for use on sandwiches and in sauces, stews and casseroles through the winter. Deer resistant.

    Average seed life: 2 years.

  • Gardening Tips
  • Featured Recipes

Best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to setting out after the last spring frost date, Hot Peppers love heat: afficionados theorize that the hotter the growing conditions, the hotter the Pepper. The heat in Peppers is related to the amount of capsaicin within the tissues and seeds. We include heat unit measurements (known as Scoville units) and arrange the Peppers in ascending incendiary order! At the height of harvest, hold a roast. Place picked Peppers on a hot grill, turning them until all sides are charred and blistered black. Pile them all in a paper bag so that they steam each other's skins off. Once they are cool enough to handle, peel off the skins, remove the stems and slice into long pieces, scraping away the seeds. Freeze in airtight plastic bags for use on sandwiches and in sauces, stews and casseroles through the winter. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 2 years.

Back to Top