Thomas Laxton Shelling Pea

55-65 days. A long-famous heirloom from the turn of the 19th century, this gratifying shelling pea yields plump, 4-inch pods of up to ten hefty, super sweet peas each, making shelling a bowlful a breeze. Wilt- and powdery mildew-resistant, the sturdy and reliable vines grow up to 3' tall and appreciate the support of a trellis. (OP.)

Special thanks to Mary Nisley of Mary's Veggie Garden for the use of her wonderful photos!

One packet of about 300 seeds
In stock
Item
#3415
$3.85
  • Buy 10 for $3.45 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $2.90 each and save 25%
  • Information
  • Memories of eating Peas straight from the vine has no doubt led many of us down the garden path with our watering can. Peas prefer cool weather so direct sow in sun and fertile soil in the spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Plant tall, climbing varieties along a sturdy or netted structure to support the plant and to elevate the pods. Harvest Shelling Peas small and tender, and Snow Peas once the pod is flat and shiny. Pick daily once Peas begin to mature. (Peas are open-pollinated and ideal for seed saving: a great activity for humans of all ages.) Found in nurturing American chicken pot pies and tuna casseroles, sinfully rich Fettuccini Alfredo, refreshing Middle Eastern minted-salads, creamy emerald-green soups and scores of winter stews, the Pea is revered around the world. Barely blanched fresh Peas with sweet butter and a light sprinkle of sea salt is the best. But admit it, who among us does not love the seven layer salad of the 1970s? In a large glass salad bowl, layer from the bottom up: 3/4 head chopped Iceberg Lettuce, 1 cup chopped Celery, 1 cup chopped red or green Sweet Peppers, 1/2 cup diced Red Onions, 1 cup fresh Peas, 1/2 cup sliced water chestnuts and 1/4 head chopped Iceberg Lettuce. Mix together 2 cups mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Spread over the top of the layered salad and chill for 24 hours or overnight. To serve, top with 1/2 cup crumbled crispy bacon, 1/2 cup chopped hard boiled eggs and 2 cups grated cheese. Toss and serve to rave reviews.

    Average seed life: 3 years.
  • Featured Recipes
Memories of eating Peas straight from the vine has no doubt led many of us down the garden path with our watering can. Peas prefer cool weather so direct sow in sun and fertile soil in the spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Plant tall, climbing varieties along a sturdy or netted structure to support the plant and to elevate the pods. Harvest Shelling Peas small and tender, and Snow Peas once the pod is flat and shiny. Pick daily once Peas begin to mature. (Peas are open-pollinated and ideal for seed saving: a great activity for humans of all ages.) Found in nurturing American chicken pot pies and tuna casseroles, sinfully rich Fettuccini Alfredo, refreshing Middle Eastern minted-salads, creamy emerald-green soups and scores of winter stews, the Pea is revered around the world. Barely blanched fresh Peas with sweet butter and a light sprinkle of sea salt is the best. But admit it, who among us does not love the seven layer salad of the 1970s? In a large glass salad bowl, layer from the bottom up: 3/4 head chopped Iceberg Lettuce, 1 cup chopped Celery, 1 cup chopped red or green Sweet Peppers, 1/2 cup diced Red Onions, 1 cup fresh Peas, 1/2 cup sliced water chestnuts and 1/4 head chopped Iceberg Lettuce. Mix together 2 cups mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Spread over the top of the layered salad and chill for 24 hours or overnight. To serve, top with 1/2 cup crumbled crispy bacon, 1/2 cup chopped hard boiled eggs and 2 cups grated cheese. Toss and serve to rave reviews.

Average seed life: 3 years.
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