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Winter Squash

There is something extraordinary about the aroma of baking Winter Squash, bubbling with butter and brown sugar. Sun-loving Winter Squash is best direct-sown in well-draining, fertile, 60°F soil, two weeks past the last spring frost date. Plant them with plenty of elbow room since they love to ramble. Squash is simple to grow and transforms easily into nutritious, heart-warming dishes: soups, gratins or sumptuous Thai or Indian curries. Squash requires fertile soil and room to stretch in hot sunshine. Harvest with a sharp blade when skin is hard and the mature coloration appears, leaving some stem. Cure in the sun for ten days or in a dry room for five days. Properly cured Squash, kept cool and dry, keeps all winter long. Bee friendly. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 3 years.

Galeux d'Eysines Squash

Galeux d'Eysines Squash Galeux d'Eysines Squash Galeux d'Eysines Squash Galeux d'Eysines Squash Galeux d'Eysines Squash
90-100 days. Cucurbita maxima. This gorgeous French heirloom produces a flattened globe with salmon-peach skin sprinkled with sugar warts, peanut-shaped bumps caused by sugar buildup under its skin. Weighing in from 10- to 20- pounds each, Gauleux d'Eysines has fragrant orange flesh that is silky, moist, exceptionally sweet and delicious, with a hint of apple and Sweet Potato. Pick Gauleux d'Eysines prior to the first hard frost and enjoy it simply sautéed in olive oil or in complex sauces, preserves, stews and soups for up to six months. (OP.)

One packet of about 20 seeds
Catalog #4120
$4.05
  • Buy 10 for $3.65 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $3.05 each and save 25%

Availability: In stock

$4.05

Gardening Tips

Winter Squash Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1”
Row Spacing:5’
Hill Spacing:5’-6’
Days to Germination: 5-10 days
Germination Temperature:65°-75°F

Winter Squash needs space to ramble as well as a hot growing site in full sunlight. They may be started after the last frost when the temperature is a reliable 60°F. Direct-sow 3 to 5 seeds per hill, then thin to the 2 strongest seedlings. To start indoors for transplanting, sow singly in pots 3 to 4 weeks before the transplant date. Provide seedlings with good ventilation, strong light and even moisture. Transplant outdoors after the last frost date. Enrich soil with organic fertilizer, compost and/or well-rotted manure. Cover seedlings with cloches if it gets cool, water regularly and feed as needed with kelp or fish emulsion. Powdery mildew on leaves won’t affect the squash. Harvest with a sharp knife when skin is hard and fruits are fully colored. As long as there is no danger of frost, you may cure squash outdoors in the sun for 10 days. Or, you may place them in a warm, dry room for 5 to 7 days to cure.

Our Pollinators are in Peril

Patience Pays Off
I’m always in a hurry to get my Winter Squash growing, and have often started them ahead indoors. But I find that the plants really dislike being transplanted, especially into chilly spring soil. I find it works best to sow directly. If your growing season is short, it helps to warm up the soil with black plastic sheets instead, cutting an X wherever a Squash plant will go.

Squash as a Groundcover
Here's a trick that saves space, keeps down weeds and deters critters, all at the same time. Plant Winter Squash along the edge of the garden and train the vines outward, through the fence. The vines will soon blanket the area just outside, shading weeds out; the leaves make a prickly carpet that some animals prefer not to walk on.

Deer Resistant Seed Varieties

Tips for Harvesting and Storing Pumpkins and Winter Squash