Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds

Days to harvest: 4 to 5. Cress sprouts are high in iron, folic acid, calcium and Vitamins B, C and K. They have a sharp, peppery, tangy flavor. Just a few go a long way! They can be added to salads and sandwiches for a kick of flavor and heat. Cress seeds should not be soaked, and should not be grown in a sprouter. The seeds are mucilaginous and will become slimy and may fail to germinate if overly wet. They should be sown indoors or in a very shady spot outdoors. Spread the seeds on a few layers of dampened paper towels in a deep tray or dish and cover them with plastic wrap to conserve moisture, especially if you won't be able to monitor the tray closely so that the paper doesn't dry out. A repurposed plastic clamshell salad container works wonderfully. After the sprouts emerge, uncover them for good air circulation. Mist sparingly two to three times a day until the sprouts are the desired size, usually about 2” tall. Trim the sprouts at the base and enjoy! The plants will not resprout. (OP.)

One packet of about 55,000 seeds
In stock
Item
#5515
$5.95
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  • Information
  • Formerly an old-fashioned ingredient in Watercress sandwiches served at tea-time, Cress is enjoying new popularity among the multitude of lush salad greens now available. New varieties offer larger leaves, various levels of bite, and rapid growth. Microgreens have hit the big time, bringing sprouted seeds into vogue in chichi restaurants. Cress prefers cool weather and moist soil, otherwise the refreshing peppery taste becomes unpleasantly hot. Most Cress will be ready for tossing into a salad or soup three to four weeks from seeding. Harvest with scissors and water with kelp or fish fertilizer to promote rapid regrowth.

    Average seed life: 2 years.
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Formerly an old-fashioned ingredient in Watercress sandwiches served at tea-time, Cress is enjoying new popularity among the multitude of lush salad greens now available. New varieties offer larger leaves, various levels of bite, and rapid growth. Microgreens have hit the big time, bringing sprouted seeds into vogue in chichi restaurants. Cress prefers cool weather and moist soil, otherwise the refreshing peppery taste becomes unpleasantly hot. Most Cress will be ready for tossing into a salad or soup three to four weeks from seeding. Harvest with scissors and water with kelp or fish fertilizer to promote rapid regrowth.

Average seed life: 2 years.
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