Roselles

Roselles are a tropical form of Hibiscus grown for their tangy edible young leaves and for their tart, deep red and succulent late season calyxes that can be made into wonderful juices, jams and teas. The calyxes have been consumed for years not just for their cranberry-like taste but also because they are said to be a natural treatment for high blood pressure. The plants themselves are also quite ornamental, growing up to 8 feet tall in warmer climates, with deep red stems, small red-eyed white flowers and, of course, the beautiful red calyxes.

One packet of about 30 seeds
In stock
Item
#6300
$4.25
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  • Information
  • Hibiscus sabdariffa. Roselles are a tropical form of Hibiscus grown for their tangy edible young leaves and for their tart, deep red and succulent late season calyxes that can be made into wonderful juices, jams and teas. The plants love heat and sun and need a long season to produce flowers and caylxes. The further north you live, the earlier you should start seeds indoors. In New England, for example, you might want to begin in late January or February. Transplant seedlings into the garden (they will be quite large) only when the soil is reliably above 70ºF and all threat of frost has passed. Even a 40ºF night can be detrimental. Water regularly and fertilize sparingly. Plants will begin flowering and forming calyxes in late summer or early fall, as they require shorter days to do so. In cold climates, be sure to enjoy the foliage in salads throughout the season, as early frosts may quash any hopes of calyxes unless plants are brought indoors.


    Average seed life: 2 years.

  • Gardening Tips

Hibiscus sabdariffa. Roselles are a tropical form of Hibiscus grown for their tangy edible young leaves and for their tart, deep red and succulent late season calyxes that can be made into wonderful juices, jams and teas. The plants love heat and sun and need a long season to produce flowers and caylxes. The further north you live, the earlier you should start seeds indoors. In New England, for example, you might want to begin in late January or February. Transplant seedlings into the garden (they will be quite large) only when the soil is reliably above 70ºF and all threat of frost has passed. Even a 40ºF night can be detrimental. Water regularly and fertilize sparingly. Plants will begin flowering and forming calyxes in late summer or early fall, as they require shorter days to do so. In cold climates, be sure to enjoy the foliage in salads throughout the season, as early frosts may quash any hopes of calyxes unless plants are brought indoors.


Average seed life: 2 years.

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