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Edamame

Native to Japan, Edamame is a highly nutritious food crop, about 40% protein and high in vitamins A, B, calcium and iron. Meaning Twig Bean, Edamame is similar to the field soybean, but it has been bred for larger seeds, sweeter flavor, more creamy texture and easier digestion. Growing Edamame is as easy as growing Bush Beans. Harvest Edamame when most of the pods are green, tender and plump, well before they begin to turn yellow. Shelled Edamame may be eaten straight out of the pod raw, or cooked and used in salads, soups, stews, stir-fries or casseroles. Instead of snacking on popcorn, munch Edamame. Boil the pods in salted water for 5 minutes, drain, sprinkle lightly with sea salt. While warm, gently squeeze the warm, sweet and salty Edamame out of the pods between your teeth.

Average seed life: 1 year.

Karikachi Edamame

Karikachi Edamame Karikachi Edamame Karikachi Edamame Karikachi Edamame Karikachi Edamame
90 days. Our prized Japanese import has three large seeds per pod with excellent, sweet flavor and a pleasing dark green color once blanched or frozen. Karikachi is quite reliable with high yields and good disease-resistance. (OP.)

One packet of about 80 seeds
Catalog #1297
$4.75
  • Buy 10 for $4.30 each and save 10%
  • Buy 50 for $3.55 each and save 26%

Availability: In stock

$4.75

Gardening Tips

Edamame Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1”
Row Spacing:18”-36”
Seed Spacing:3”-6”
Days to Germination:7-14 days
Germination Temperature:60°-80°F

Growing Edamame is as easy as growing Bush Beans. It also loves sun and well-draining, fertile soil. Direct-sow Edamame when the soil has warmed to 60°F and all danger of frost has passed. Amend the soil as needed with organic fertilizer, compost and/or well-aged manure. Cool, wet weather may necessitate a second planting: Edamame seeds rot in cold, damp soil. After planting, do not water until the sprouts emerge, unless it is very hot and dry. After emergence, and throughout the season, avoid watering the foliage. Water by soaking the soil around the plants and fertilize with kelp or fish emulsion as needed. Harvest Edamame when its inedible pods are green, tender and plump, well before they turn yellow. Meaning ‘twig bean’ in Japanese, Edamame is similar to the field soybean although it has been bred for larger seeds, sweeter flavor, a more creamy texture and easier digestion. Chill, freeze, boil or blanch the pods shortly after picking before their sugars convert to starch. Most commonly boiled for 5 to 10 minutes in salted water before popping them out of their pods into your mouth, Edamame is about 40% protein and high in vitamins A, B, calcium and iron.

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