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Cabbage

Cabbage is as nutritionally rich as it is versatile; enjoy it in Cabbage rolls, Basque Cabbage soup with white beans and sausage, coleslaw or sauerkraut. Cabbage is best grown as transplants, sown 6 weeks before setting out, 4 weeks prior to the last spring frost date, or in early summer for late fall harvest. Cabbage has a kingly appetite and prefers organically rich, neutral pH (6.5 to 6.8), well-draining soil. Cabbage favors cool weather, growing sweeter after being kissed by frost. Cabbage tastes best harvested when heads are wrapped tightly, in smaller sizes. A member of the Brassica family, Cabbage should be not be grown in the same site as other Brassicas for 4 years. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 3 years.

Kosaro Red Cabbage

New! 74 days. This disease-resistant, brilliant deep red Cabbage produces 5” to 7”, 3-pound heads wrapped in gorgeous gray-purple foliage that will beautify any veggie garden. Plant them close together for small heads or give them more room for larger, more mature heads. (F1.)

One packet of about 100 seeds
Catalog #1527
$3.95
  • Buy 10 for $3.55 each and save 11%
  • Buy 50 for $2.95 each and save 26%

Availability: In stock

$3.95

Gardening Tips

Cabbage Sowing Instructions
Planting Depth
:1/4” -1/2”
Row Spacing:24”-36”
Plant Spacing:12”-18”
Days to Germination:5-14 days
Germination Temperature:70°-75°F

Best raised as transplants, start Cabbage indoors 6 weeks before planning to set out, which can be up to 4 weeks before the last expected frost date. Sow 1 to 3 seeds per pot in a sterilized seed starter mix. Provide strong sunlight, cool temperatures, good ventilation and even moisture. When plants have 3 to 4 true leaves, thin to the strongest seedling per pot and harden the plants off by gradually getting the plants used to outdoor temperatures and light. Cabbages have “kingly” appetites! Prepare a well-draining, sunny site by digging deeply and adding plenty of well-rotted manure and/or compost. Fertilize Cabbages as needed until late summer. Cabbage tastes best harvested when heads are wrapped tightly, in smaller sizes. A member of the Brassica family, Cabbage should not be grown in the same site as other Brassicas for 4 years.

Floating Row Covers
Many summer pest problems can be avoided with an ounce of springtime protection. Lightweight floating row covers, placed over young transplants as soon as you set them out, will keep out the flying insects that later turn into root maggots and Cabbage worms - both of which bother brassica crops such as Broccoli, Cabbage and Kale. The covers will let in plenty of light, air and water, but you'll need to pull them aside when you weed. Do this early in the morning when flying insects are the least active, to keep them from laying their eggs. By the time the plants are big enough to be constrained by the covers, they'll be mature enough to withstand a couple of little buggies and won't need the covers anyway.

Long Life for Cabbages
Next time you harvest Cabbages, try leaving the stem and roots on before you put them in your root cellar, or other cool, moist storage area. They will keep better and you can produce a second crop from each stem. Pot up a stem, with the Cabbage head removed, in a large pot of soil mix, feed and water, and wait for tasty young leaves to sprout all along the stem. Great for winter soups!

Alcosa Baby Cabbage

Shade Tolerance

Deer Resistant Seed Varieties