Toma Verde Tomatillo

60-70 days. Toma Verde is our favorite Tomatillo variety because of its earlier maturation and exceptional sweetness: it tastes like a cross between a Lemon, a Pineapple and a Tomato. This dependable, prolific variety also produces larger size fruit than others, up to 2” in diameter. Underneath its papery husk, Toma Verde is deep, bright green. As it ripens, its verdant green color pales to a less intense, slightly soft green color with an almost golden blush. To help manage Toma Verde’s enthusiastic, rangy, semi-determinate growth, surround each plant with a large Tomato cage, or even better, a three-foot diameter cage made of reinforcing wire. They develop into bushy, sprawling plants that measure between three and four feet across. We love Toma Verde in our Roasted Tomatillo Salsa Verde (it freezes well for use all winter in fajitas and quesidillas du jour). We also love to grill them quartered and brushed with extra virgin olive oil on skewers as a side with grilled steak or chicken. (Remove the husk only when you're ready to use the fruit. Don’t be surprised to find that once the husks are removed, the skin may be sticky and need to be rinsed in cold water.) (OP.)

One packet of about 20 seeds
In stock
Item
#4350
$3.85
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  • Information
  • A distant relative of the Gooseberry and the Tomato, Tomatillos grow inside their own little papery gift bags. This humble, delicious and fun-to-grow star of Mexican cuisine is enjoying quite a spike in popularity due to their prominent role in snappy salsas, piquant sauces and complex southwestern stews. High in vitamin C and beneficial antioxidants, Tomatillos have a sweet citrusy brightness and seductively compelling flavor. Without a doubt, Tomatillos are best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to being set outside in full sun after the last spring frost date. Once established in the garden, it thrives with virtually no attention, and is seemingly immune to blights, ailments or pesty insects. Deer resistant.

    Average seed life: 2 years.
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A distant relative of the Gooseberry and the Tomato, Tomatillos grow inside their own little papery gift bags. This humble, delicious and fun-to-grow star of Mexican cuisine is enjoying quite a spike in popularity due to their prominent role in snappy salsas, piquant sauces and complex southwestern stews. High in vitamin C and beneficial antioxidants, Tomatillos have a sweet citrusy brightness and seductively compelling flavor. Without a doubt, Tomatillos are best raised as transplants sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks prior to being set outside in full sun after the last spring frost date. Once established in the garden, it thrives with virtually no attention, and is seemingly immune to blights, ailments or pesty insects. Deer resistant.

Average seed life: 2 years.
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