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Sprouting Seeds

Sprouts are tasty and good for us: packed with vitamins A, C and E, iron, potassium and amino acids as well as being the best ultra-local (your home) supply of off-season greens. Wispy, delicate Alfalfa Sprouts have a mild, slightly nutty flavor, adding a fresh green crunch to salads and sandwiches. (You must try Manfred’s Popeye & Olive Oil Sandwich.) A millennial pantry staple in Asia, Mung Bean Sprouts have a crunchy heft that is essential in all kinds of astounding recipes, from stir-fries and spring rolls to soups and side dishes. There are commercial sprouters available, but the old jar method works just fine. Fit mason jars with a screen for rinsing and draining sprouts or simply use cheese cloth stretched and held in place over the jar mouth with an elastic. The process of seed sprouting is easy. And it goes like this: Rinse. Soak. Drain. Rinse. Soak. Drain. Repeat. Detailed growing instructions are posted HERE and come with every order. Measure out enough seed to cover the bottom of the jar. Clean, cull and rinse seeds with tepid water before soaking. After soaking, drain out the water: the seed should be damp but not wet. Put the jar out of direct sunlight (it could cook the seeds). Every 8-12 hours, add enough water to cover the seeds then drain the water out, leaving the seeds damp but not wet. Provide good air circulation and a consistent 70°F for optimum sprouting (cooler temps retard sprouting and warmer temps push too hard). Prior to harvest, give the Sprouts a little light so that they can green-up. Give a good, thorough final rinsing to remove any remaining hulls. Drain well prior to refrigeration. Use fresh for up to a week or two. Interested in sprouting more types of seed? You can also use the seed of Arugula, Black Turtle Beans, Broccoli, Onions, Peas, Radishes and Watercress for more zesty sproutings. These flavorful, tangy Sprouts are an amazing addition to baby leaf salads and as an haute cuisine garnish strewn atop special main dishes. You can get so creative with Sprouts~a secret ingredient to mystify and fascinate your dinner guests.

Average seed life: 3 years.

Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds

Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds Curled Cress Sprouting Seeds
New! Days to harvest: 4 to 5. Cress sprouts are high in iron, folic acid, calcium and Vitamins B, C and K. They have a sharp, peppery, tangy flavor. Just a few go a long way! They can be added to salads and sandwiches for a kick of flavor and heat. Cress seeds should not be soaked, and should not be grown in a sprouter. The seeds are mucilaginous and will become slimy and may fail to germinate if overly wet. They should be sown indoors or in a very shady spot outdoors. Spread the seeds on a few layers of dampened paper towels in a deep tray or dish and cover them with plastic wrap to conserve moisture, especially if you won't be able to monitor the tray closely so that the paper doesn't dry out. A repurposed plastic clamshell salad container works wonderfully. After the sprouts emerge, uncover them for good air circulation. Mist sparingly two to three times a day until the sprouts are the desired size, usually about 2” tall. Trim the sprouts at the base and enjoy! The plants will not resprout. (OP.)

One packet of about 55,000 seeds

PLEASE NOTE: This new item will begin shipping in mid-February, 2020.
Catalog #5515
$5.95
  • Buy 10 for $5.35 each and save 11%
  • Buy 50 for $4.45 each and save 26%

Availability: In stock

$5.95

Gardening Tips


There are many commercial sprouters out there, but the old jar method works just fine. You can fit mason jars with a special screen or simply use cheese cloth stretched and held in place over the jar mouth with an elastic. Measure out the appropriate amount of seed to sprout (if you have a sprouter, follow the directions that came with it. If using the jar method, add enough seed to just cover the bottom of the jar). Clean, cull (throw out non seeds) and rinse seeds with tepid water before soaking. To soak, add tepid, non-chlorinated water, (3 parts water to 1 part seed) and let soak for the appropriate amount of time for the seed you are sprouting. Discard any non-seed material that floats up. After soaking, drain out the water: the seed should be damp but not wet. Put the jar out of direct sunlight, which could cook the seeds. Every 8 to 12 hours add enough water to cover the seeds and swish around to get all the seeds wet. Drain the water out, leaving the seeds damp but not wet. All sprouts need good air circulation, and a consistent 70°F temperature for optimum sprouting: cooler temps retard sprouting and warmer temps push too hard. Most sprouting seeds do not need light in the early sprouting stages but for the last two days before sprout use they should have some diffused light so they can green up a bit. Check each variety for the approximate days to harvest.

For the final rinsing, fill the entire sprouting container with water. Most of the Sprouts will shed their hulls or seed coats during this final rinsing for skimming off. Thoroughly drain the sprouts for 6 to 8 hours prior to refrigerating them. Store Sprouts dry-to-the-touch in airtight containers. Sterilize your sprouter between crops: mix a capful of bleach to a pint of water, soak for 15 to 20 minutes, scrub well and rinse thoroughly!

Countertop Sprouts Gardening